A veggie that can be easy to overlook, radishes are easy and fast to grow, offering a crunchy texture and peppery flavor that’s made it popular in Mexican cuisine.

Check out all our radishes varieties: Cherry Belle Seed, French Breakfast Seed

Are Radishes Taken For Granted?

Are Radishes Taken For Granted?

Given their ubiquity on the supermarket produce shelf and in restaurant salads, we suspect that many people take radishes for granted. Even gardeners are guilty: many plant quick-germinating radishes among other slower-growing vegetables such as carrots and/or cucumbers—prone to being overtaken by weeds—to mark their location so newly-emerged seedlings won’t be pulled out mistakenly as weeds!

Interesting Facts About Radishes Plants

Fact 1
The Radish—Raphanus sativus—is a hardy annual root vegetable and member of the large Brassicaceae family which also includes cabbage, broccoli, kale, cauliflower, Brussel sprouts, turnip, and arugula to name a few.
Fact 2
Radishes have been around a long time: their cultivation can be traced back to China in 2700 B.C. And, in Egypt, apparently, they predated the pyramids. Cultivated by the Ancient Greeks and Romans, they were among the earliest vegetables brought to the New World.

Radishes Gardening Tips

Difficulty
Difficulty

Easy

Sun
Sun

Full sun.

Water
Water

Keep soil uniformly moist but soaked. As always, be sure to water gently when seeds are first planted and just after seedlings appear. Early morning watering is best.

Soil
Soil

Well-drained, loose, cool soil works best. Well-drained, loose, cool (45°F) soil works best.

Air
Air

50-65°F is ideal for growing plants.

Timing
Timing

Direct sow seeds outdoors in early spring after the danger of frost has passed. Plant again in early fall, per seed packet planting instructions. Depending on variety, radish plants typically mature 21-30 days from seeding.

Planting
Planting

Plant seeds ¼-½ ” deep. Thin 2″ seedlings to 2-3 inches apart (refer to seed packet for details).

Germination
Germination

3-10 days, 45-85° F. Seeds won’t germinate above 95°.

Feeding
Feeding

Organic fertilizer can be added at planting time.

Mulch
Mulch

Important to reduce weeds and conserve soil moisture.

Pests & Diseases
Pests & Diseases

Homegrown radishes grown from seed aren’t particularly prone to problems. Insect threats include flea beetles, aphids and caterpillars that will munch on the foliage. Cutworms can be a problem for seedlings.

Special Considerations
Special Considerations

For best results, rotate crops every 2-3 years.

Companion Plants
Companion Plants

Beans, beets, carrots, cucumbers, lettuce, melons, nasturtium, onions, spinach, squash and tomatoes.

Container-Friendly
Container-Friendly

Yes, especially since they’re so fast growing!

Harvesting Radishes

Harvesting Pull up your radishes from the ground as soon as the roots start to stick up out of the soil. Don’t leave them for too long; otherwise they will become too tough and fibrous. Their flavor is dependent on temperature: generally the cooler it is, the milder they will be. Harvest them before it gets too hot.

Growing Radishes—Highlights

  • Easy and fast-growing, consider putting radishes on your short-list of crops to grow from seed.
  • One of the best vegetables for children to grow from seed since they provide the closest thing to ‘instant gratification’ (Cherry Belle and Sparkler varieties, especially).
  • Ranging from mild to spicy, radishes not only make a delightful crunchy addition to any salad or sandwich, they’re also delicious as a snack or appetizer on their own.
  • Our heirloom homegrown radishes—in different sizes and shapes—will knock your socks off, particularly if you’ve only ever tasted mass-market varieties.
  • Cold and light-frost-tolerant, radish seeds can be planted continuously early and late in the growing season and harvested well into the fall, though they will bolt in in the height of summer’s heat.
  • Similar to many other vegetables you can grow in your garden, radishes are low calorie and high in fiber. They’re a great source of folate, riboflavin and potassium, as well as vitamin B6 and other minerals.

Here at Bentley Seeds, we want to set you up for success. Our growing guides are designed to give you all the information you'll need to start growing from seed, in an easy-to-digest format.

We also encourage you to print out a copy as a handy reference in your garden.