Whether you’re looking for a good slicing cucumber for salads, or the perfect cuke for pickling, we’ve got you covered with our popular cucumber varieties.

Check out all our cucumbers varieties: Boston Pickling Seed, Marketmore 76 Seed

Cucumbers: Summer’s Underrated Culinary Staple

Cucumbers: Summer's Underrated Culinary Staple

We’re guessing you don’t spend much time thinking about cucumbers, especially in mid-winter. But, if you were to think about them, you might agree they’re a culinary staple. Even if you are among the few people who don’t like pickles (!), surely, you would agree that summer menus just wouldn’t be the same without them. Wouldn’t you miss cucumber and tomato salads? Or, how about English tea cucumber sandwiches?

Interesting Facts About Cucumbers Plants

Fact 1
Cucumbers—Cucumis sativus—is an annual vegetable and member of the gourd family—Cucurbitaceae—which also includes zucchini, pumpkin, summer squash and watermelon.
Fact 2
They contain phytochemicals which kill the bacteria which causes bad breath.
Fact 3
Cucumbers can also cool blood temperature; when applied topically, they can ease swelling, which is why they are used regularly in facial regimens.
Fact 4
Cucumbers have high alkaline levels which can help regulate your body’s pH and neutralize acidity levels. Consuming them can relieve gastric distress.
Fact 5
If you slice them and place them in boiling water, the resulting steam can reportedly relieve stress when inhaled.
Fact 6
Tired of fogged up bathroom mirror? Eliminate the fog by rubbing a cucumber slice across it.
Fact 7
If you’re a cat owner, be careful about dropping/leaving one on the floor: apparently, a cucumber’s faint resemblance to a snake can elicit a dramatic, primal feline fear response.
Fact 8
It is thought that the cucumber originated in India about 10,000 years ago, later spreading to Africa and Southeast Asia. Of course, now they are ubiquitous worldwide.

Cucumbers Gardening Tips

Difficulty
Difficulty

Easy.

Sun
Sun

Minimum of 6 hours. Plenty of sunshine is the key to growing cucumbers successfully.

Water
Water

Cucumbers LOVE water and will become stressed (and bitter) if they don’t get enough consistently. Take care not to over-water, especially when seeds are first planted.

Soil
Soil

Well-drained, light soil, rich in organic matter; pH 6.0-7.0. Soil must be warm – at least 65°F – for cucumbers to grow well.

Air
Air

40°F to 75°F

Timing
Timing

For an earlier harvest, start seeds indoors about a month before the last anticipated spring frost. Or, they can be direct sown outside after all danger of frost has passed. Ambient air temperature should be above 40°F; warmer is better but not super hot.

Planting
Planting

Indoors: sow 3 seeds per pot in 2-inch pots, ¾” deep; thin to 1-2 plants/pot. Direct-Sow Outdoors: 1″ deep, 6-8″ apart or plant them in mounds, 3 plants per hill, with each hill around 2-3 feet apart.

Germination
Germination

3-10 days+. Ideal germination temperature: 60-90°F; will germinate faster at higher temperatures.

Time to Harvest
Time to Harvest

50-75 days

Feeding
Feeding

Cucumbers are heavy feeders so be sure to start with soil rich in organic material and add organic fertilizer when the first flowers appear.

Mulch
Mulch

Black plastic mulch helps to speed soil warming and protect young plants.

Pests & Diseases
Pests & Diseases

To avoid problems, don’t plant them in the same spot every year.

Special Considerations
Special Considerations

If the leaves turn yellow, that means the plants need nitrogen

Companion Plants
Companion Plants

Sunflowers, corn (tall plants to provide shade from hot afternoon sun), beans, peas, radish, okra. Don’t plant with potatoes or aromatic herbs.

Container-Friendly
Container-Friendly

Yes, at least 8″ deep. A bigger container is better.

Harvesting Cucumbers

Harvesting Cucumber fruit can ripen at different times on the same plant. It’s important to pick each fruit as it’s ready to avoid leaving it on the vine too long which will cause it to become bitter.

Growing Cucumbers—Highlights

  • Cucumbers (“cukes”) are the second most popular backyard vegetables (some call them fruit) in the U.S., after tomatoes, estimated to be grown by almost half of all home gardeners.
  • There are two different classes of cucumber plants: one produces fruit well suited to pickling, while the other produces fruit for slicing. We offer one of each.
  • Slicing cukes, known primarily as a nice crunchy addition to salads and sandwiches, fresh, cool cucumbers complement a number of summer recipes. Cucumber somehow pairs naturally with plain yogurt, tahini or sour cream and is a great foil for spicy ingredients.
  • As for pickles, everyone knows they go with everything.
  • They’re easy to grow but don’t like it when it gets too hot; it’s best to plant them among taller crops that can provide some light shade
  • They continue to produce throughout the summer even as you harvest fruit.
  • They’re relatively slow-growing, so you should plant them as early as possible, noting that they’re especially susceptible to frost.
  • Like many other fruits (yes they are a fruit and not a vegetable), cucumbers are low in calories and high in fiber (especially if you eat the skin). They contain a number of nutrients including vitamins A, B, C, and folic acid, as well as magnesium and potassium. Several studies have demonstrated that they have cancer-fighting properties as well. As if that weren’t enough, they also help you stay hydrated as they’re 96% water!

Here at Bentley Seeds, we want to set you up for success. Our growing guides are designed to give you all the information you'll need to start growing from seed, in an easy-to-digest format.

We also encourage you to print out a copy as a handy reference in your garden.